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The ADHD Blue Print to Your Best Year Ever

The beginning of a new year inspires hope for new beginnings and better outcomes. Many people will review their goals and chart a new course or make New Year’s resolutions. Other people, perhaps even you, have abandoned any hope that this year can be different than years past. While you may be motivated to change – after all, if you’re living with ADHD, you likely face major challenges in your life that you’d like to address – you’ve learned the hard way that maybe you’re better off avoiding setting goals and making New Year’s resolutions.

After all, your track record for achieving either has been poor and you can’t, or don’t want to, deal with the disappointment and guilt you feel when things don’t pan out. It’s true that one sure way to avoid failing is not to try, but unfortunately, if you want your circumstances to change, you have to change something you are doing. That change demands that you form an intention to change – that’s where the goals or resolutions come in – but it also requires effort and a plan, and that’s where things often go wrong for anyone with ADHD. However, there is another way.

How to Have a Better Year without Setting Goals

If setting goals scare you, there’s a simpler and just as effective approach. Create new habits that manifest the desired changes in your life. We’ve all heard that a journey of a thousand miles begins with one step, but there’s an even more powerful underlying truth here. A journey of a thousand miles, or even ten thousand miles, is made up entirely of single steps! Achieving long-term goals by creating new habits is extremely powerful, and ultimately, even more effective than traditional methods of achieving goals.

Your 6-Step Blueprint for Creating a New Habit

Here are a few steps to creating a new habit:

1)  What results do you want? Do you want to be more physically fit? More organized? On time? More focused? Less chaotic? Have better relationships? The sky’s the limit. Pick just one that means a lot to you. Once you master the process of creating new habits, you’ll be able to take full control of every aspect of your life, but choose just one to practice on first.

2)  What small but consistent actions would allow you to move closer to the results you want? Many people want to lose weight or get in better shape. They join a gym, buy exercise equipment and eat only salads. By the time they’ve been working at it three weeks, they’re exhausted and fed up! If you want to become more physically fit, start small. Create a new habit to always take the stairs instead of the elevator at work.

If you want to feel more organized, don’t start a major cleanup of your whole house; create a new habit to make your bed every morning before you leave your room. You’ll immediately feel more organized and that feeling will slowly spread to other areas of your life. Once you’ve established a habit of making your bed so well that it’s automatic, add another habit, like washing your dishes immediately after using them.

Every big change in your life starts with one step, one new habit. If you want to be on time for work, start by creating the habit of preparing your clothes and lunch the night before. If you want to improve your focus, create a habit that will help you sleep better. If you want to improve your relationship, develop a habit of listening instead of interrupting.

You may need to break some changes down to even smaller steps and work your way up, especially if you’ve never purposefully created and kept a habit. (You do have some habits; how often do you accidently forget and leave your house naked? Getting dressed is a habit!) Analyze the actions you need to take. For example, what steps would help you sleep better? You will sleep better if you turn off the computer at least two hours before bed. It also helps to dim the lights in the house after supper. Don’t do them all at once, but create a habit of first one, then the next, and so on, and before long, you’ll sleep better than you ever have.

3)  Improve your odds. You won’t remember to do what you’re supposed to automatically in the beginning – it’s not a habit yet! Set visual or auditory reminders. Find a buddy who is also striving to build new habits and encourage each other. Make a game of it. Anchor your new habit to an existing one. For example, when I wanted to write my first program for adults with ADHD, “Grow With the Flow” (now called “Thrive!”), I anchored the new habit of writing every morning by placing a pencil and paper where I sit to have breakfast, a habit I’ve now had for quite some time, and that has helped me create many programs for adults with ADHD, one step at a time!

4)   Determine how you’re going to track your progress. Even after repeating the action for what seems like a very long time, ADHDers often forget habits they’ve created. You get distracted. However, if you also make it a habit to use tracking software like HabitBull or a scorecard, it can help you stay motivated, especially if you reward yourself as you progress, and you won’t forget to keep up the habits you’ve put in place.

5)  Celebrate your progress. You need to stimulate the hedonistic part of the brain (right brain) by creating a positive experience of change. Make it fun to create habits, not something you dread. This will help you keep going and make future change easier.

6)  Be OK with occasional slip-ups. It takes an average of 66 days to create a habit – and that’s only an average – but the longer you maintain it, the more solidly it’s anchored. Aim for consistency but if you fail one day, just let go of the guilt and disappointment and recommit to your habit. Chalk it up to being human. Miss one day and all is not lost. However, we tend to see little slips as failures and actually help make that true. If you cheat on your diet by having a cookie, you can get back on track by not having any more cookies, but many people see that as a failure and say, “What the heck, I’ve cheated now. I’m a cheater! I might as well eat the rest of the bag!” That’s when the trouble starts. No slip up needs to be a major crash. If you lift weights every day but one day you miss your weight training, you don’t have to start over at the beginning the next day. It’s the same with habits.

Remember, start with a small, simple change and create one habit at a time. Build from there. And please share your new habit with us in the comments section (above)!

Interview on the Economic Impact of ADHD and It’s Big

Attention Talk Radio interview as Jeff Copper and I discuss the findings of a journal review on the Economic Impact of Childhood and Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in the United States.

Among notable information:
“The overall national annual incremental costs of ADHD ranged between $143 and $266 billion”.
Adult ADHD counts for $105 to $194 billion and yet are an area where very few resources are provided.

Another interesting fact that might get the business world’s attention is that a very large proportion of the costs are in the area of productivity losses and revenue losses at $87 to $128 billion. Of course, this is in 2010 US dollars. For Canada, with its population at around 10% of that of the US, the proportion would likely be about 10% of these figures give or take a billion or two.

ADHD adults lose an average of $10,532 to $12,189 in income per year compared with the average of non-ADHDers.

New Book for Adults with ADHD Now Available!

“With Time to Spare”

By Linda Walker

With Time to Spare: the Ultimate Guide to Peak Performance for Entrepreneurs, Adults with ADHD and other Creative GeniusesYes, you heard that right! There’s a new book out for adults with ADHD, and it’s been getting rave reviews! Linda Anderson, a Master Certified ADHD Coach and the Past-President of ADDA (Attention Deficit Disorder Association) loved it! David Giwerc, President of ADDCA (ADD Coach Academy), an ADHDer himself, and a leader in the field of adults with ADHD and one of the founders of ADHD Awareness Week in the U.S. raves about it! Why, even Canadians like it! 😉

Our own Rick Green, writer, comedian, actor and star of the hit documentary, “ADHD and Loving It!?” liked it so much, he’s enrolled in the The Maximum Productivity Makeover for Creative Geniuses Group Coaching program that the book is based on. Dr. Annick Vincent, one of the foremost recognized ADHD experts in Quebec, who appeared with me last week on the Montreal television talk show, “Les Kiwis et les Hommes” told me she couldn’t stop talking about it at last month’s CHADD (Children with Attention Deficit Disorders) conference (because, of course, children with ADHD have parents with ADHD!)

This new book, With Time to Spare: the Ultimate Guide to Peak Performance for Entrepreneurs, Adults with ADHD and other Creative Geniuses, is now available on Amazon.com.

Oh, did you notice something else? Did you notice the author’s name? That’s right! I wrote this! I sat down in January 2010 and began to write the book that had been waiting to be written. I’ve been working on it for over a year, and I packed it full of valuable, practical, difference-making advice for adults with ADHD taken right from the trenches of my own life with a husband and adult daughter with ADHD, and proven time after time in real life with my ADHD clients.

I was committed to writing a book that would both inspire and guide my readers, and after months of writing and countless edits, I had it tested by several readers with ADHD or entrepreneurial ADD. I was thrilled when the verdict came back with a resounding “YES!”

So I am proud to announce that With Time to Spare is now available in paperback at Amazon.com and in Kindle version at Amazon.com, Amazon France, Amazon UK, and even in Italy and in Spain. (Sorry Canada! We’re struggling to make it available in my home country).

To your Focus, Action, Success,

Linda Walker

From Rags to Riches: ADHD Money Strategies Training

adhd-money You asked for it… finally, you’ve got it! I’m thrilled to announce I will be offering my ADHD Money Management course. The timing is perfect. You can take this course now and, instead of digging yourself out of a financial “Christmas hangover” in January, this year you can avoid the problem in the first place!

No More ADD Tax!!!

As you know, adults with ADHD struggle with many aspects of managing money. You impulsively make purchases you later realize were poor choices (don’t you hate “infomercials!”) You pay more parking and speeding tickets, late fees, interest charges and penalties – one of my clients calls it the “ADD Tax” – due to inattentiveness and forgetfulness. And chronic disorganization means you’re on a never-ending paper chase.

If you think a money management course will put you to sleep, let me assure you that ADHD Money Management 101 is not a snore-fest of investment advice or directions for creating the perfect budget. Let’s be honest… you haven’t done those things in the past, and you’re not going to start now. No, managing money with adult ADHD demands a completely different approach. Besides, if you’re going to invest, you’ll need to know what your financial situation is, and once you know, you’ll probably need to put some ADHD-friendly strategies for managing your money in place to build up a nest egg first.

What makes this program different? Well, first we’re going to help you take notice of your beliefs. Believe (Ha ha!) it or not, your beliefs about money are the thermostat that decides how much money you’ll make and how much money you’ll keep. If you want more, you’ve got to learn to turn that thermostat up! Then we’ll show you how your habits are keeping you from reaching your full financial potential and we’ll set you on the right track to putting in place the right systems and habits so that you can “manage” your money by setting it and forgetting it!

We haven’t offered course since 2007. Are your finances in good enough shape to wait until the next time we offer it? Sign up now and get your finances on track for a secure future. This 4-week course begins on Wednesday, November 23rd. To register right now, visit ADHD Money Management 101.

The Montreal Chapter of the LDAQ presents: Tax Credits, Government Programs

Tax Credits, Government Programs & More!

Financial Advice for Parents of Youth/Young Adults with ADHD, LD and/or Asperger’s Syndrome

On Tuesday, February 15th, 2011 7:30 p.m.

Speaker:

Nathan Leibowitz is an advisor with Assante Wealth Management. With an MBA in finance and an extensive tax background, he consults with Canadian individuals and businesses for their investment and tax planning needs. Nathan has been hosting workshops and presentations for the special needs community over the past number of years. Along with his team of lawyers, C.A.’s and insurance specialists, they have helped numerous families both receive more money from the government and ensure the long term needs of their loved ones are properly looked after. With the complex requirements of different governments and authorities, they help families efficiently navigate the process.

Topic: This presentation will address questions such as:

  • How do we maximize tax credits and deductions for our child/young adult?
  • What government programs are available for our family?
  • How to protect government benefits currently received?
  • Is the Registered Disabilty Savings Plan the best option for our child/teen?
  • How do the proposed budget changes affect our situation?
  • How to ensure properly structured wills and/or mandates?

Everyone is welcome. A small donation from non-members of the chapter would be appreciated to help defray meeting and photocopying expenses. LDAQ publications and other material will be available for purchase before and after the meeting.

HÔPITAL MONTREAL CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Ampitheatre D-182, 2300 Tupper, Montreal

In case of snow storm please call 482-7196

Attitude Is Everything!

PS: main focus on thumbRemember the experiment I invited you to do in the last article ( ADHD Brainwashing First, Transformation Follows ) about changing your point of view before you get the results you’d like to see. If you recall, the lesson is that belief in the possibility always comes before the results you are seeking. If you don’t believe something is possible, you won’t make it happen. Instead, as soon as things start looking as though they aren’t going your way, you give up, usually accompanied by an, “Ahah! I knew it wouldn’t work!”

If you’re looking for proof, waiting to see the results before you believe they are possible, you already have your belief… you believe it’s not possible.

Often times, you consider doing something to improve your life, saying:

“I’d like to buy that book….”

“I’d like to take that course…”

“I’d like to hire that person…”

The sentence continues: “…but… “followed by “…I can’t afford it” or “…I don’t have time”.

Actually, in your head (or hidden in your heart of hearts) is the real rest of the sentence… It is, “…because it won’t work for me anyway.”

If there was no question that the:

Book would reveal the secret to achieve your dreams…

Course would teach you exactly what you need to know to win your dream job…

Interviewee sitting across from you was exactly the right person to help take your company to the next level…

You’d do it in a heartbeat, budget and agenda be damned!

But you have proof that it won’t work, because nothing else you’ve started (with that same attitude) has worked. But imagine if the results depend on the attitude and not the other way around! What becomes possible? If instead, you believed it would work, you’d find the time, the money or whatever resource you need. You’d make it happen.

How You Can Use This?`

  1. Write a statement describing what you’d like to do, followed by “but,” and then followed by the obstacle you perceive.
  2. Consider what your real belief is about yourself. Is there any other underlying belief that could be stopping you? .
  3. Now consider, if you didn’t believe this, what could you make happen? .
  4. If you like what you imagine, change your belief. (Yes, it’s that easy.) .
  5. Related posts:

    ADHD Brainwashing First, Transformation Follows
    Sing Your Heart Out
    Who Are You Not To Be Great?

ADHD Brainwashing First, Transformation Follows

celebrateI’m sure you’re familiar with this quote:

“When it comes to the future, there are three kinds of people: those who let it happen, those who make it happen, and those who wonder what happened.” – John Richardson Jr.

I’ve always thought there are really only two kinds of people: victims and victors. Either you’re creating a life you’re excited about (the victor), or you’re complacent, letting things happen and just hoping to survive (the victim). As a victor, you’re moving forward, ignoring or beating every obstacle, paddling upstream… or you’re the victim, caught up in the challenges of a difficult life you didn’t ask for, swept along by the current.

You can choose to be the victor, or you can choose to be the victim. I’m not judging… We’ve all played both roles. If you’re a Creative Genius “in the rough,” a struggling ADHD adult, artist, author or entrepreneur, my husband and I relate to what you’re going through. We have both felt like victims of his adult ADHD.

We’ve struggled as a couple with almost every aspect of our relationship. We fought about the distribution of household chores, his driving, his impulsivity and as a result, my nagging, to name just a few. I felt very insecure and our entire family was often destabilized as Duane quit job after job because he knew he was about to be fired and moved us across the country (and back) in search of the “perfect” career.

Financial problems created by impulsive purchases and forgetting to pay the bills on time added to this feeling of insecurity. The car broke down because he’d forget to get it fixed and I didn’t have the energy to take on one more task. Every day was a disaster waiting to happen.

Fourteen years ago I was seriously contemplating divorcing my ADHD hubby. The only reason I stayed with him was his quirky sense of humor and my belief that he was a diamond in the (very, VERY) rough! Today, we are more in love and more passionate than ever about each other. We overcame our financial problems, we learned how to work as a couple, and Duane realized that it’s easier to turn the career you choose into the perfect career (in fact, it might be the only way to have that perfect career.)

What changed for us?

The other evening, Duane and I were discussing what came first, the change in attitude (for lack of a better word) or a better life (a better relationship along with financial and job security?) Did we enjoy a better attitude because things were going better, or did things go better because we adopted a better attitude? We arrived at the same conclusion: a better attitude comes first. It was only when we decided we were meant to be greater than what we had been so far that we empowered ourselves to take control of our lives. It was this belief that led us to make the choices and take the actions that lead to success, and without believing it first, we never would have had the courage to act.

We created and are still progressing toward a life we love by investing in ourselves, even when we didn’t have the financial means to do it.

Was it easy? No… and yes. (I know, I’m supposed to say Yes and No but I’m a bit of a non-conformist.)

It was hard.

It was hard having creditors calling us, and it was no fun not having money to have fun! But we realized that if we were unwilling to sacrifice some short-term pleasure, we were sacrificing something much larger… the future we could have had. So we created a system to manage and eventually eliminate our debts (no we didn’t go bankrupt), we cut expenses – restaurants, concerts, etc. – and found creative ways to have fun inexpensively.

Our youngest daughter needed us to advocate for her in school – she has ADHD and learning disabilities – and our oldest daughter needed our attention. While we both worked outside the home, we soon found that by committing to our future, we were motivated to learn to communicate better and learn to manage the household as a team and create a better life for our daughters and us.

There’s more (a lot more!) but I’d have to write a book or a soap opera script … maybe I will one day. :

It was easy too.

Our newfound belief in ourselves, the new vision of ourselves we created, and our improved attitude, which was the result of our self-imposed and self-inflicted “brainwashing,” made it so much easier because we knew our struggles were only temporary… we were taking action to move out of that crappy life.

Hope backed by action was and is still an amazing aphrodisiac for life. I invite you to choose to see the diamond in the rough, the Creative Genius that lies in wait within you, take control and create a life you love, one that allows you to act powerfully in your areas of strengths and passion.

How Can I Use This Today?

Pick one thing you wish was different. To use a very simple example, let’s say you want the clerk at the store to be nice to you, instead of being rude as usual. Instead of being the victim of his rudeness, take a leap of faith and believe the clerk isn’t being rude. Provide yourself with a different point of view. He’s not rude; he’s just trying to serve you as quickly as possible. He isn’t purposely cold and unwelcoming. Now, believe this new point of view and act accordingly. Instead of glaring at the clerk because he’s so rude, smile and thank him for serving you so quickly. To push this experiment as far as you can, tell him you love coming to his store because you always get such efficient service (and that is true… you just wish he smiled while he was being so efficient!)

What’s your investment? You might have to admit you’re wrong and that the clerk is not actually rude. And what’s the potential payoff? You stop being the victim and become the victor. And there’s an excellent chance you’ll get amazing service accompanied by a friendly greeting (this visit and every time you return to this store!)

Related posts:

Sing Your Heart Out
Who Are You Not To Be Great?

Four Secrets for Making a Dream Come True

You can travel to Italy… or wherever you want to go… or to make any other dream you can imagine come true.

My husband, Duane and I have been in Rome for almost two weeks of our four-week trip we’re taking to celebrate our 25th wedding anniversary.  This is a dream come true, and what’s even more amazing is that we’re doing it all without borrowing any money.  Nope, we won’t even have a big credit card bill greeting us when we get home.

Let me share some of the secrets that allowed us to take a pain-free, debt-free one-month trip to Italy:

We used delayed gratification.  Two years ago we decided we wanted to do something special for our 25th anniversary and chose to travel to Italy, home of some of the most amazing art in the world (Duane is an artist and has always wanted to see Michelangelo’s work firsthand).  In the past, Duane, an impulsive ADHDer, would have called a travel agent, booked our flights and figured out the rest later.  We’ve learned that this is the hard way of doing things, after all, how can you enjoy a trip that is sinking you deeper in debt?

Instead, using the wisdom acquired from past mistakes, we estimated how much it would cost for such a trip in May 2009, and began to plan what it would take – knowledge, money, paperwork, and reservations – to actually make a month-long trip to Italy.  It was quite a stretch for us and we wondered if it would be possible.

We created a plan.  We began by identifying two or three steps we could take that would bring us closer to our dream.  We looked at our options for travel and accommodations.  We listed all the things we wanted to see. We started to figure out the financial requirements and did research.  The more we learned, the more steps we could add to our plan, and sometimes we discovered we had to go back and make changes to our plan, but that was easy to fix, and it wasn’t stressful as we knew we had plenty of time to adjust.  Too often, people put off taking any action until they have all the information, but if we had made that mistake, we never would have made this trip.

We fed our dream.  It’s difficult for any ADHDer to maintain focus on some far-off objective, and Duane struggled to remain motivated without impulsively booking the trip right away.  We allowed ourselves some instant gratification in seeking out art and travel information about Italy.  We borrowed books from the library and purchased others, regularly consulting books, maps and pictures of Italy to make the dream more real.  Duane consulted art books to map out what he’d go see first hand when we finally made it to Rome and Florence. We planned, discussed, and dreamed about Italy for two years. This allowed us to remain motivated and made us far better prepared for the trip when it was time.  It was also a lot of fun!

We created a system. Duane’s standard approach to taking a vacation was to go; he’d run up the credit card bills and then deal with the fall-out upon his return.  Sometimes it would be several years between vacations as we scrimped and saved to pay down the debt, and I’d be stressed during the vacation watching the charges mount, and we’d all be stressed when we arrived home, knowing the huge bill that was waiting.

We wanted this trip to be different, so even though it was the biggest trip we’d ever taken, we developed a plan and created a system to accumulate the required funds BEFORE we left. We opened a bank account and set up automatic monthly deposits. At first, we felt the pinch of the diverted funds but very quickly adjusted our lifestyle and avoided over spending. We changed our credit card to one that provided travel points and carefully managed our spending so that the majority of our purchases went on the credit card to accumulate points but was completely paid off each month.

For extras on the trip, Duane even started to accumulate his loose change.  Each day he would carefully hide away whatever change was in his pocket.  We weren’t counting on this money, but small efforts really can add up – over the course of two years, he accumulated $2,160 in loose change, a very nice bonus.  You should have seen the teller when we staggered into the bank with his load of change!

I’m writing this article, sitting in my apartment in Rome.  We’re taking the day off from sightseeing because we just spent three glorious days exploring every nook and cranny of Florence, the birthplace of the Renaissance, and the only stress I feel right now is whether we should go to Venice this weekend, or if it would be less crowded if we waited until after the weekend.  Does that sound like a dream to you?  It did to us, and we made it come true.  What dream will you make come true?

Arrivaderci from Rome!

Break Free of Your “Sorry, No Money” Chains!

In my parents’ generation, talking about money was taboo.  I’ve been very open about the serious financial problems Duane and I had, because we both know how not talking about it only made the problem worse.  For a long time, Duane and I put our heads in the sand, hoping the problem would go away.  But we had to face it, to talk about it and to take action.

Yes, it’s embarrassing to admit it we had money problems.  It’s probably something you’d like to think would just disappear if you ignore it too.  But our financial problems taught us that they don’t go away by themselves.  You have to take positive steps to overcome the problem.  Our experience also taught us that there is a solution.

In all the years Duane and I struggled financially, we searched for and tried many ways to overcome this major source of fighting in our family.  We bought books, put ourselves on strict budgets and spent hoursà often every day, just trying to deal with our financial misfortune.  We had to collect empty bottles to turn in for the refund just to buy groceries.  Using a budget, we’d make some headway but felt so deprived that at some point we couldn’t handle it anymore and we’d go on binge and fall off the wagon.

We also felt guilty!  Every time our kids would ask to go to special school or church outing, we’d have to say “Sorry sweetheart, but there’s no money!”  We even turned down programs that would help us work through our financial difficulties, saying “Sorry, no money!”  When the investment opportunity of a lifetime presented itself, we’d reluctantly say “Sorry, no money!”

Years of following the same pattern, depriving ourselves, followed by binging, and feeling guilty about it, we realized that spending every waking moment of our lives worrying and thinking about our lack of money did not bring us closer to our goals, and certainly wasn’t helping us lead the life we’d imagined.

Finally, we decided to take a different approach to managing our finances.  Instead of the “binging and dieting” approach of splurging and budgeting, we decided to change our money lifestyle.  We faced our limiting beliefs around money and shifted them.  (It’s amazing how changing your thoughts really can change your life!)  Finally, we made small but significant changes to the way we managed our financial health.  Before long, we were able to stop spending all our time thinking about money because the situation was fixing itself automatically.

If you’re tired of having to say “Sorry, no money!” and you’d like to learn to manage your finances more successfully, join us on ADHD Money Management: Finally Dollars and Sense group coaching program (http://tinyurl.com/adhdmoney) that starts on Monday, February 9th at 8:30 pm. Don’t wait, space is limited!

Manage your Finances without a Budget

Most personal finance gurus insist that to take charge of your financial health, you need to create and stick to a budget.  For most ADHDers a budget is BOOORINGGGGG and so all but impossible.

Because even if you believe a budget is essential, you’re not likely to be able to prepare one, or follow it… remember, it’s boooringggg!  Boring things don’t stimulate your brain.  Trying to focus on tasks such as preparing a budget when you’re brain isn’t stimulated is about as easy as driving your car around the block when you can’t get the engine started.

No wonder adults with ADHD suffer financially far more than the “neuro-typical” population.  But you’re not doomed to financial hardship, bankruptcy or a retirement age of 97!  You just need a different, non-budgeting, approach to managing your financial health… an approach that isn’t boring.  (No, not gambling!)

What worked for Duane and me – and believe me, if it worked for us, it can work for anyone – was to stop trying to manage our money the traditional way (and failing miserably!) and adopt ADHD-friendly ways to organize our finances.  It all started with a three-step process:

1. We took our financial pulse – it wasn’t pretty, but knew how deep a hole we were in (and it was deep!)
2. We figured out where we wanted to be by deciding what was important to us, and what really wasn’t.
3. We started looking for money “hidden in the sofa cushions.”  No, not really, but by being aware of the money our poor choices were robbing from us, we were able to start getting out of debt (instead of getting in deeper every month!) using the money we were already earning!

Already, I was thrilled, and that was just the beginning!  In a couple of days I’ll tell you how we went from having 17 maxed out credit cards, no savings and an old rusted car that we owed five thousand dollars on, to being debt-free (except for a small reasonable mortgage), with a nice home, retirement savings.  On top of that, we purchased a new car for cash, and this spring we’re going on a one-month vacation to Italy this year.

If you want to cut to the chase, learn the secret to our success, and start on your own road to financial recovery (no, we won’t try to get you in Amway), go right now and register for the ADHD Money Management: Finally Dollars and Sense group coaching program that starts Monday, February 9th at 8:30 pm. http://tinyurl.com/adhdmoney

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