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Archive for the ADHD Information Category

Rick Green of TotallyADD Talks About His Challenges with Focus

Rick Green, creator of the TotallyADD.com Website and of several documentaries, including the notable, ADD and Loving It, talks about his struggles with inattention, how it affected his productivity, how he improved his ability to focus, and a surprising outcome.

Interview with Rick Green on the Focus to Freedom Blueprint Mastery program from Linda Walker on Vimeo.

Facebook Live Event: ADHD, Forget Anything?

On Tuesday, October 18th at 8 pm EST (5 pm PST), I’ll be holding a Facebook Live Event on my Facebook page.

ADHDers struggle with remembering information they received moments before, this is a little-known fact but a major issue

ADHDers struggle with remembering information they received moments before, this is a little-known fact but a major issue

During this 45- to 60-minute live Facebook session, I will explain the root causes of the challenges ADHDers face with their memory, the negative impacts it has on your life and I’ll provide 5 strategies to overcome it and its frustrating impacts.

I’ll even let you in on what completely changed my view of ADHD in my husband and my personal experience with ADHD.

When: Tuesday, October 18th at 8 pm EST (5 pm PST)

Where: My Facebook Page

Join me if you or someone you love struggles with ADHD by responding to the Facebook event ADHD, Forget Anything?

 

Facebook Live Event: Supporting Your Spouse with ADHD

I often get questions from spouses of adults with ADHD about how to help their ADHDer. To answer the largest number of queries on this subject, I have decided to make it the subject of my very first Facebook Live event.

And so, I am excited to announce my first Facebook Live event, which will air on Thursday, September 22nd at 7:30 pm EST – 4:30 pm PST, called How to Support Your ADHD Spouse.

During this mini-conference, I’ll share with you the 5 top strategies that helped me support my husband, Duane, who was the poster-child for ADHD.

You’ll have the opportunity to ask your burning questions on the subject of supporting your spouse with ADHD in the comments box on my Facebook page, from which the event will be streamed and I’ll respond live. The event will last 30 to 45 minutes.

Now, this is a first experience and so we’ll discover together where it will take us so I’m hoping you’ll join me.

Like my page.

2016-09-22-FB-Live-spouses

Let’s Declare 2016 the Year ADHD in Women Gets Recognized

Let’s Declare 2016 the Year ADHD in Women Gets Recognized

womanWhen my daughter was diagnosed with ADHD in 1994, there was virtually no information on ADHD in girls. Some doctors even told me it was impossible. At the time, specialists willing to admit it existed said that for every girl with ADHD, there were 3 or 4 boys who had it. Today, I still occasionally hear the same statistic quoted though we now know it is completely false. The new statement should be “for every 3 or 4 boys we diagnose with ADHD, we fail to diagnose and treat 2 or 3 girls.” We fail because we don’t recognize that ADHD often does not manifest itself the same way in girls as it does in boys.

The Impact of Unrecognized ADHD in Girls

The daydreaming girl who sits quietly at the back of the class doesn’t get recognized because she is quiet. She also doesn’t get the attention she needs to thrive and achieve her full educational potential. She does not have the opportunity to choose a career that allows her to contribute using her unique strengths. Without that opportunity, she may instead, land a job that forces her to work in her areas of weaknesses, handling details or doing work that bores her to tears. Not all ADHD women end up like this but that is, for many girls, the cost of not being treated.

Women Have Unique Issues

Women also struggle with unique issues. While we may have made great strides in sharing responsibility in the home, the responsibility of dealing with family details (a child’s friend’s birthday party, managing meals and daycare, dealing with housework and renovations, helping kids with homework, etc.) often fall on mothers. In this situation, many ADHD mothers feel overwhelmed and incompetent. When they let a ball drop, they feel a great deal of guilt and shame. On this front, we need to address these issues and change how we divide chores and responsibilities so that every member of the family contributes, not by some arbitrary standard of what each member “should” do, but going instead with your strengths.

Finally! Some Attention Given to Women’s Inattentiveness

Next year, 2016, arriving in just a few short days, has a great deal in store for women with ADHD.  First, the ADHD Women’s Palooza, hosted by Linda Roggli and Terry Matlin, will take place from January 11 to 16th. I’ll be one of 31 guest speakers address issues of ADHD in women exclusively.

Secondly, Sari Solden, author of Women with Attention Deficit Disorder and Journeys Through ADDulthood, will be hosting the Better Together Festival in Ann Arbor, Michigan. She decided to hold a festival (which sounds a lot like a big party!) to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the launch of her ground-breaking book, Women with Attention Deficit Disorder, on May 14th, 2016.  I’ll also be attending this event along with a long list of other ADHD specialists.

Let’s use these two events as catalyst to put more attention on the unique challenges faced by women with ADHD for the coming year and let’s find better solutions for them.

And the Winner of the “Quick Wins” Contest Is….

drumroll-pleaseWe’ve been hard at work developing the new program you were invited to help me find a name for! In fact, we held a contest to name the new program, which we were calling “Quick Wins”, a program of small changes that make a significant difference in your life quickly. Today, we finally get to announce the new name, the winner of the contest AND the launch of the new program! It’s a BIG DAY!

First, thank you to everyone who participated in the contest. There were so many great ideas, it was a challenge to choose, but we finally picked a name that defines this program well. So…
Drum roll please….

The name of the new program is
Your Path Forward
Conquer Your Adult ADHD One Step at a Time

And the creative genius who came up with this name is Bob R. Congratulations Bob! (We’ll be in touch with you in the next few days). The winner gets to choose between receiving a new Fitbit Flex or a $129 credit off any one of my programs he enrolls in (we increased it from $100).

Now, I want this to be a winning program for everyone so I’m inviting you all to enroll in Your Path Forward for FREE! Click here to take this 12-week program that will guide you through a number of small, simple steps that will lead to real change in your life.

Coach Linda Walker’s Master Travel Checklist

Earlier this month, I was coaching a client who was getting ready to travel for her vacation and she related the stress that travel tends to generate in her. Her biggest issue was that she feared forgetting something important. She didn’t want to have the added expense of replacing some item she forgot.

Having everything you need when vacationing reduces stressI mentioned how one ADHDer had a great idea for avoiding forgetting things by creating a travel checklist. He would print his Travel Checklist, plasticized and kept it in his suitcase. Then every time he realized he’d forgotten something, he’d add it to the list for the next time. Of course, he had to reprint and re-plasticize his list. When I began to travel extensively for work and pleasure I adopted his strategy only I used Evernote and created a Master Checklist, which I copy into a new note so that I can use the Checklist feature. Like him, every time I’d forget an item, I’d add it to my Master Travel Checklist – no reprinting or plastifying involved. Evernote synchronizes in all my devices so I can check the same list off my tablet pc, my mobile phone and laptop. It is almost perfect now. However, if you notice anything missing, please add it in the comments box below.

When my client and I ended our conversation, I had made a mental note (Note to self: mental notes are as good as the paper they’re written on) to post my CoachLindaWalker-Master Travel Checklist. You are welcomed to use it.

As you travel this summer, please take the time to enjoy your well-deserved time off and be safe.

Contest to Name Free ADHD Adult Program

I’m creating a new program and I need your help finding the perfect name for it. I’ve been wracking my brain trying to find a great name for this program and I thought, why don’t I ask all of you Creative Geniuses. As an enticement, I decided to make a contest out of it. If you’re the person who comes up with the winning name for the program, I’ll send you a cool new gadget, a Fitbit Flex or if you prefer, you’ll receive a credit of $100 on the next of my programs you enroll in!.

Why a New Adult ADHD Program?

Here’s what it’s all about: Over the years, working with executives, professionals, entrepreneurs and other adults with ADHD, I’ve noticed that many collect information on ADHD (some of them have whole libraries full!) but never do anything with that information. In fact, a couple of years ago at an ADDA conference, one of the attendees and I were browsing through the bookstore and she mentioned to me that she already knew a lot about ADHD, having read most of the books. What she needed was to work on taking action. She laughingly said, “I just need something that’ll take me by the hand and spoon feed me one thing to do at a time!”

I replied with a smile, “You mean, you need another mother!” But it got me thinking, and I came up with this idea.

Knowledge Doesn’t Mean Change

I realized that even though a lot of information was circulating, being read, discussed and debated, and it was great information, accurate, practical, information that could change lives, people just weren’t acting on it.  And of course, without action, there’s no change.

Now, I also saw people who were putting information into action. The thing was, I noticed they were a little over-enthusiastic. They’d try to change everything at once! Imagine trying to quit smoking, lose weight and train for a marathon at the same time! When you engage in multiple major changes simultaneously, it makes you so incredibly uncomfortable that you can’t sustain the changes and you revert quickly to your old ways.

Is it an Inability to Change or the Approach?

This is why many ADHDers come to me saying, “I can’t change! I’ve tried everything.” In reality, they’ve tried two approaches that don’t work: “change everything all at once,” and “learn everything and change nothing.” They haven’t tried the always successful, “learn a little, apply the change in your life, evaluate and adjust, repeat” approach.

A New Program for ADHD

That’s why I was inspired to create a training program for adults with ADHD where members receive excellent information in small doses, and they are assigned a small but significant action to take. Once they take action, adjust and get comfortable, they get another dose of information with another small but significant action to take. After all, that’s how you change, with small but significant actions applied in your life.

Soon, I’ll be inviting any who dare to take action to join me on a three-month journey where you’ll begin to really make transformative changes in your life. Right now, I’m calling it my “quick wins” program for lack of a better name (and because it’s too long to say, “learn a little, apply the change in your life, evaluate, adjust, repeat”!)

These “quick wins” are small changes that make a significant difference in your life quickly. Oh! and by the way, the journey will be free! That’s right, I’m launching this new program at no cost (though there are no guarantees it will stay that way, so if you’re interested in taking part, keep watching for my announcements. If you’re not already subscribed to my newsletter – like if someone forwarded you this email – make sure you sign up today to be notified when we launch!)

Details of the Contest

Ok, now that you know a bit about the program, I’m sure you’ve got some great ideas for a name. I’m totally serious about giving a Fitbit Flex (or the $100 credit on your next Coach Linda Walker program purchase) to the winner! Click here to enter your ideas. Don’t procrastinate, because the contest closes on February 27th, 2015 at 11:59 pm PST.

P.S.:  Yes, I’m completely serious. I am giving away a Fitbit Flex to the person who suggests the winning name for this new program. And I’m completely serious when I say that this new program won’t cost you a penny during our three-month pilot, so if you’re not already subscribed to my newsletter, make sure you sign up for my newsletter to be notified when we launch!

ADHD and Sleep Issues from A to Zzzzz

If you have ADHD and you struggle to fall asleep, you’re not crazy, you’re not being bad and most of all, you’re not alone. Several studies have revealed that people with ADHD are more likely to have irregular circadian rhythms. What’s a circadian rhythm? According to the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, “circadian rhythms are physical, mental and behavioral changes that follow a roughly 24-hour cycle, responding primarily to light and darkness in your environment.”

Are You Out of Sync?

Circadian rhythms are the changes that happen in your body that make you sleepy at night (when it gets dark) and make you want to wake up in the morning as it grows light. As many as 70% of adults with ADHD complain they have difficulty falling asleep, wake up tired (or not at all without enormous effort) and feel out-of-sync with the rest of the world.

If you work independently and don’t need to follow the same schedule as the rest of the population (perhaps you live on a desert island?!), this may not be a problem. (Sounds pretty lonely though!) However, if you must interact with family, friends, peers, customers or anyone else who’s not on the same schedule as you while they’re awake, this can cause problems.

It’s Not Just “Beauty Sleep”

Falling asleep at 1 or 2 AM may not be a problem if you’re a freelancer who answers to no one in real time and you can wake up at 9:30 or 10 AM, but if you have a day job or if customers expect you to answer the phone between 9 AM and 5 PM, you’ll have to cut your sleep short to make it to the office on time. The resulting lack of sleep will affect your ability to focus, your capacity to deal with and manage stress and the functioning of your working memory.

If you’re “tired” of struggling (wink! wink!) luckily, studies show that you can adjust your circadian cycles with a few relatively simple techniques. As someone who has struggle all my life with insomnia, I have tried many of these strategies myself. Here are a few that have the biggest impact:

Humans are like plants; our internal clock is usually set with day light. When daylight hits your eyes, your brain signals your body to increase your body temperature and starts secreting hormones, like cortisol, to modify the electrical activity in the brain. In the evening when light begins to dim, this triggers the production of the sleep-inducing hormone, melatonin. In ADHDers, however, melatonin production is often delayed.

1. Manage Your Light

If you struggle to fall asleep, start dimming the lights at home as early as right after supper. Stay away from blue-light-emitting sources, like computer screens at least 3 to 4 hours before you need to fall asleep.

2. Exercise

Many of my clients with ADHD report dramatically better sleep quality with earlier sleep onset when they engage in cardiovascular exercise (not at bedtime, but during the day!). Cardiovascular exercise is any activity that makes your heart beat faster for at least 20 minutes, such as jogging, taking a brisk walk, moderate biking, aerobics, cross-country skiing, hockey, basketball, skating, etc. Pick one or more sports you enjoy and do at least 20 minutes each day. You’ll find your sleep will come more easily.

3. Top Up on Melatonin

Studies have shown that supplementing melatonin with light management can advance sleep onset. You can find melatonin supplements at some pharmacies and certainly at health food stores. They work even better when you use them in combination with light management.

4. Zone Into Sleep With Sound Waves

Research shows that the brain is frequency-following, that is, you can train it to fall into a certain brainwave pattern by listening to sounds in that frequency. Our brain regulates our state of wakefulness by changing the amplitude and frequency of brain waves. To fall asleep, we produce Delta waves in lengths of 0.5 to 4 Hz. Some sounds induce our brain to fall into Delta waves. I use the sounds of the ocean and find that it really works for me. My youngest daughter, Kyrie, and ADHDer, had problems falling asleep until we started playing ocean sounds, along with improving her sleep hygiene, at bedtime.

5. Change Your Mind

Many ADHDers find their thoughts churn at bedtime, which keeps them from falling asleep. By thinking about what happened today or what will happen tomorrow, you’re activating certain hormones that keep you awake. Changing what’s going on in your mind might be as simple as reading stories – not work-related stuff – before bed. If you struggle to put a novel down, read short stories like the ones you’d find in Readers’ Digest.

6. Do a Mind Dump

If you’re still plagued by concerns over what you have to do, dump all those thoughts in a notebook that you place next to your bed. “Dumping” will help you avoid staying awake because you’re afraid you’ll forget.

ADHDers need to be vigilant about taking care to engage in good sleep hygiene. Lack of sleep DOES NOT CAUSE ADHD; however, lack of sleep can make your symptoms worse, so taking care of your brain and its creative genius by sleeping enough can help reduce your struggles. Everyone, whether or not they have ADHD, needs 7.5 to 9 hours of sleep per night; less sleep than that and you’re not able to tap into your brain’s potential.

If you find that one of these strategies has helped you, or if you have your own approach that works wonders, please share it in the Comments section below.

And have a life time of great night’s sleep!

Speaking at ADDA Conference this Summer

I’m excited to announce that I’ve been selected to speak at this summer’s ADDA Conference, the only international conference for adults with ADHD.

Overworked, Overwhelmed and on a Collision Course for Burnout has been selected.

I’m also organizing a panel discussion for spouses of ADHDers: For Non-ADHD Spouses Only! Creating a Strong Relationship with Your ADHD Spouse Non-ADHD Spouses Share Their Recipes for Success, along with Eva Green (TotallyADD), Victor Roggli (spouse of ADDiva, Linda Roggli), Dean Solden (Sari Solden’s husband) and Wilma Fellman who has agreed to moderate.

As ADDA Worplace Committee Chairperson, my team and I will be showing off our new presentation targeted at employers to sensitize them about the challenges of ADHD in the workplace.

and finally, I’m really excited about offering a full-day pre-conference workshop, Managing ADHD in the Workplace for HR Professionals, with Michelle Geiman, Director of Human Resources at Ohio University.

The conference takes place from July 24 to 27, 2014.

Interview on Global TV’s Morning Show with Camille Ross

 

Had a short interview on October 21st, 2013 on Global TV’s Morning Show with Camille Ross. For those people wondering about the resources I mentioned (I actually forgot one) here they are:

http://www.coulditbeadhd.ca  A short test to determine if you might have ADHD

http://www.add.org  An international organization that empowers adults with ADHD

http://www.caddac.ca  A Canadian ADHD Advocacy group

http://www.totallyADD.com  A great resource for webinars and an online adult ADHD community

https://coachlindawalker.com  (this is the one I totally forgot) I offer free ecourses on productivity for adults with ADHD and write a blog.

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