Unleash Your Creative Genius

Blog Francais

Come for a Taste Test of the ADDA Conference

ADDA-Conference

This year the ADD Association (ADDA) will be celebrating its 25th Anniversary in Orlando, Florida from July 24 to 27th during the ADDA Conference, a conference specifically for adults with ADHD and their loved ones.

I’ll be one the presenters. In the recording below I talk about two of the sessions I’ll be offering:

  • Overworked, Overwhelmed and on a Collision Course for Burnout
  • ADHD in the Workplace

If you’re still on the fence about attending this year, or you know you’re registered but don’t know which sessions to attend, ADDA has a solution to help you figure that out. They are offering a couple Taste Test sessions next week. You’ll hear various speakers talk about their sessions and what’s in it for you.

Click here for more information on the Taste Test sessions.

In the meantime, here’s a recording I did to tell you more about my sessions.

ADDA Conference

I hope to see you this July 24th to 27th at the ADDA Conference in Orlando, Florida.

ADHD Time Management Woes Part 3: Big Picture thinking

ADHD Time Management Woes Part 2: Overwhelm

ADHD Time Management Woes Part 1: The To-Do Book

Speaking at ADDA Conference this Summer

I’m excited to announce that I’ve been selected to speak at this summer’s ADDA Conference, the only international conference for adults with ADHD.

Overworked, Overwhelmed and on a Collision Course for Burnout has been selected.

I’m also organizing a panel discussion for spouses of ADHDers: For Non-ADHD Spouses Only! Creating a Strong Relationship with Your ADHD Spouse Non-ADHD Spouses Share Their Recipes for Success, along with Eva Green (TotallyADD), Victor Roggli (spouse of ADDiva, Linda Roggli), Dean Solden (Sari Solden’s husband) and Wilma Fellman who has agreed to moderate.

As ADDA Worplace Committee Chairperson, my team and I will be showing off our new presentation targeted at employers to sensitize them about the challenges of ADHD in the workplace.

and finally, I’m really excited about offering a full-day pre-conference workshop, Managing ADHD in the Workplace for HR Professionals, with Michelle Geiman, Director of Human Resources at Ohio University.

The conference takes place from July 24 to 27, 2014.

Interview on Global TV’s Morning Show with Camille Ross

 

Had a short interview on October 21st, 2013 on Global TV’s Morning Show with Camille Ross. For those people wondering about the resources I mentioned (I actually forgot one) here they are:

http://www.coulditbeadhd.ca  A short test to determine if you might have ADHD

http://www.add.org  An international organization that empowers adults with ADHD

http://www.caddac.ca  A Canadian ADHD Advocacy group

http://www.totallyADD.com  A great resource for webinars and an online adult ADHD community

http://www.coachlindawalker.com  (this is the one I totally forgot) I offer free ecourses on productivity for adults with ADHD and write a blog.

Interview on the Economic Impact of ADHD and It’s Big

Attention Talk Radio interview as Jeff Copper and I discuss the findings of a journal review on the Economic Impact of Childhood and Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in the United States.

Among notable information:
“The overall national annual incremental costs of ADHD ranged between $143 and $266 billion”.
Adult ADHD counts for $105 to $194 billion and yet are an area where very few resources are provided.

Another interesting fact that might get the business world’s attention is that a very large proportion of the costs are in the area of productivity losses and revenue losses at $87 to $128 billion. Of course, this is in 2010 US dollars. For Canada, with its population at around 10% of that of the US, the proportion would likely be about 10% of these figures give or take a billion or two.

ADHD adults lose an average of $10,532 to $12,189 in income per year compared with the average of non-ADHDers.

ADHD and Relationships on CJAD Radio

Last evening had the opportunity to be interviewed by Laurie Betito on the Passion Show on CJAD Montreal 800 AM.

Host of CJAD's Passion show, Laurie Betito, and ADHD Coach Linda Walker

Host of CJAD’s Passion show, Laurie Betito, and ADHD Coach Linda Walker

It was lovely meeting Laurie and having a chance to help more adults with ADHD have a better lives.

As you know, internationally, it’s ADHD Awareness Month. It’s time we take the stigma out of ADHD and help ADHDers live their full potential.

If after listening to the show you think you may have ADHD, there is a test you can complete at www.coulditbeadhd.ca

Listen to the show on ADHD and Relationships with the link below:
ADHD and Relationships with Laurie Betito and Linda Walker

[soundcloud url="http://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/113776351" width="100%" height="166" iframe="true" /]

ADHD Adults Need to Focus to Thrive – a new group program

by Linda Walker

If you’re subscribed to my newsletter you know I’ve just launched a new program called Thrive! The Natural Approach to Optimal Focus and Effectiveness for Creative Geniuses.

In this video, I’ll cut to the chase to provide you with information so that you can decide if you want to know more.

I’d love to hear what you think of the video. Thanks for taking the time to let me know.

What If It’s Not Procrastination?

By Linda Walker

struggling to focusNothing’s more frustrating than to plan to complete a certain task only to discover you don’t “feel like it,” you’re “not in the mood,” or you’re blocked, “drawing a blank.” You’ve spent time you’ll never get back, and you have nothing to show for it. We hear adults with ADHD are poor time managers, but when you make the effort, when you do what you’re supposed to do… it would really be nice if you accomplished what you planned. After all, it’s not like you have nothing but free time the rest of the week!

Even when you do everything they say

You dismiss it as “writer’s block,” or not being “in the zone,” and juggle appointments, staying late, again, to make up for the unproductive time you wasted. It’s so frustrating because you followed every time management expert’s recommendation: you broke your project into manageable chunks, you planned time to work on those tasks, you blocked off appointments in your agenda so no one could ask you to do anything else, you eliminated distractions (maybe you even hid out at a coffee shop to avoid phone calls and emails) and it still didn’t work. Hours have slipped through your fingers, never to be recovered, and you have nothing to show for it.

Mention this to most people and they’ll dismiss it. “You’re just having a bad day. It happens to everyone.” When it happens again, people wonder why you’re “procrastinating.” After all, you didn’t get it done today, so you’re rescheduling it for tomorrow, or the next day. It sure looks like procrastination. And they’ve got great advice for that too! They tell you, “Always do the toughest thing first.” Someone else confides that their secret is, “Always do the easiest thing first.” Another offers the always helpful, “Just do it.”

But when it happens regularly, they begin to look at you sideways. “Maybe you’re blocked because you’re not facing your fears?” Or the old favorite, “Maybe you don’t really want to succeed; are you sabotaging yourself?” Maybe you’d even believe them, if it wasn’t for the fact that sometimes, you’re not sure why, the stars align and everything clicks. You’re able to get things done, faster and better than anyone else. Obviously you can do this. You start to wonder if you’re crazy.

You can’t tell if you’re not managing your time properly, if you’re procrastinating or if you’re secretly self-sabotaging! What you do know is that nothing seems to work, at least it never works well enough that you can count on it.

You’re missing the real reason

What if I told you that you’re missing the real reason for your inconsistent performance? You’re not lazy, procrastinating, or even crazy. You’re not “afraid of success.” No, the real problem is that your energy levels are not optimal for the activity you have planned. Everyone’s energy levels fluctuate throughout the day. However, adults with ADHD are particularly susceptible to variations in brain energy. Concentration or mental focus requires a lot of energy, so if you plan to tackle an activity that requires your full attention at a time when your energy levels are low, you’ll struggle. You’ll find it impossible to focus, difficult to control your urge to fidget and a complete waste of time to attempt to “will” yourself to concentrate anyway.

Most people underestimate the importance of matching your energy levels with the demands your activities place on your brain. Unaffected, the prefrontal cortex can function well enough through a range of energy levels. However, as an adult with ADHD, your impaired prefrontal cortex is sensitive to even slight variations. The effect of a drop in energy is so dramatic, just understanding your own energy cycle so you can schedule tasks to match the appropriate energy level well lets you reliably finish whatever you plan rather than having to reschedule because you “weren’t in the mood.”

Scheduling the right activity at the wrong place in your energy cycle is like throwing perfectly good time out the window. I had one client, Diane, who had taken the plunge, leaving her job to start her own business. Within six months, she was desperate. Consulting contracts weren’t coming in because she was really struggling to complete and deliver her proposals. Funds were running low and she was wondering if she was cut out to be a business owner. She contacted me to help her to overcome her procrastination; she really needed to be able to prepare and submit proposals on time.

Once she explained the situation, I recognized that her main problem was not actually procrastination. It became obvious that because she was unaware of her energy patterns, she was attempting to work on her proposals at the wrong time of the day. In fact, her time allocation was completely off.

In the week following mapping out her peak energy cycles she called at 6 pm in a panic. She’d been trying unsuccessfully for the last four hours to complete a proposal for a potential client despite a next-day deadline. In the past, if nothing else worked, she’d count on the deadline to get her focused enough to complete the proposal, but today even that wasn’t working.

I helped her see that proposals require a lot of mental energy and that she’d have better results if she scheduled this work at a time when her energy cycle was high. She decided to tackle the proposal the next day during her peak energy time, and the next morning called me back, excited because she’d just completed her proposal, with ease, and it had only taken her 45 minutes! She had time left over to check her figures, have it edited and deliver it by the end of the day.

She loved the feeling of being “in the zone.” She got more done, in less time, and turned out better quality work. No surprise, really, that she got the contract.

Most people don’t pay attention to fluctuations in their mental energy, treating each hour of the day as if they were all the same. Unfortunately, while this may not dramatically affect most people, adults with ADHD are working at a real disadvantage when they don’t match their activities to their mental energy patterns. Many ADHDers also have habits that affect their energy patterns, making it difficult to stabilize and recognize their own energy patterns.

To improve your effectiveness:

      1. Adopt ADHD-friendly strategies to understand, identify and stabilize your energy patterns;

 

      2. Take note of your predictable energy pattern fluctuations and how they affect your ability to focus, your need to move and your periods of exhaustion throughout your day

 

      3. Optimize your mental energy by matching the type of energy necessary for each task to the best time to complete it

 

      4. Engage in healthy habits that energize your brain

 

      5. If you still struggle to put this puzzle together, get the help of an ADHD coach who understands how ADHD affects energy patterns and how your energy patterns impact your ADHD.

Coach Linda Walker, PCC, helps adults with ADHD improve their productivity at work, achieve work-life balance and prevent burnout. The author of With Time to Spare: The Ultimate Guide to Peak Performance for Entrepreneurs, Adults with ADHD and other Creative Geniuses, she is also the creator of The Maximum Productivity Makeover and Thrive! The Natural Approach to Optimal Focus and Effectiveness.

Page 1 of 1212345...10...Last »